Jul
7

CPH Meal #5

Preparations for our fifth meal included a foraging trip to the beaches of Lammefjord on the west coast of Sjælland. Chef Emil gave us a crash course in the different plants and herbs growing so abundantly and we managed to get some nice footage.

While on the hunt mostly for beach coriander, scurvy grass and beach mustard, Emil also discovered oodles of beach cabbage – something he hadn’t expected to find by early May – and decided it would make for a lovely appetizer, served simply blanched and with a dash of cream.

The rest of the film was shot during the serving of the meal, which we held at the lovely wine bar Ved Stranden 10.

May
5

Pics from CPH Meal #5

A little delayed but here are some shots from our last event (there’s more here). Thanks again to everyone who came – we loved how this one turned out. Special thanks also to Christian at Ved Stranden for his lovely wines and for being such an amazing host.

We’re hatching some plans for the summer and we can’t wait to release the details. As ever, stay in touch on Twitter and Facebook and you’ll be the first to find out when we have something concrete to share.

Guests arriving at CPH Meal #5

Emil Glaser

Beach cabbage

Beach cabbage

Squid, rhubarb, milk

Squid, rhubarb, milk

Grilled cucumber, ramson, veal fibres

Grilled cucumber, ramson, veal fibres

Pork belly, asparagus, seaweed

Pork belly, asparagus, seaweed

Peas, pine, yoghurt

Peas, pine, yoghurt


Apr
4

CPH Meal #5 – WOW!

Thanks to everyone for the, quite frankly, confounding response. Unfortunately, it does mean that quite a number of you were left disappointed. It’s important to understand just how busy our chefs are and that this event was planned around one of Emil’s very rare days off.

We’re currently trying to think of some way to make it up to those that didn’t get tickets. We’ll get back to you after easter.

Thanks!

Apr
4

CPH Meal #5 – Tickets on sale!

Tickets for our next event are available here.

There are only 16 places available, so you’ll need to be quick!

Sorry! SOLD OUT.

Apr
4

CPH Meal #5

Spring has definitely arrived here in Copenhagen, and with it comes our fifth event. Chef Emil is very excited about serving up his interpretation of the new season’s offerings. Tickets will go on sale on-line on Wednesday, but until then, here’s the menu and event details.

When: Monday 9th May, 6pm
Where: Ved Stranden 10
What: Five courses + five wines
Price: 350DKK + small booking fee.

Menu

  • Squid, rhubarb, milk
  • Grilled cucumber, ramson, veal fibres
  • Pork belly, asparagus, seaweed
  • Samsø cheese
  • Peas, pine, yoghurt
Apr
4

Emil Glaser

CPH Meal chef, Emil Glaser

Our next event (details imminently) will be our first working with young Swedish chef Emil Glaser. Still only 21, Emil has already racked up well over two years in Noma’s kitchen. We met up with him last week to finalise plans for the evening and to learn what drove him to don the whites.

Growing up, Emil’s parents would take him to visit his grandparents on their farm outside Warsaw in Poland. He didn’t know it at the time, but the trips were instrumental in his decision to become a chef.

Recalling the feeling of picking and eating a carrot grown by his grandparents, Emil hints at a pure sense of connection with nature and its bounty: “As a kid I saw the whole process on the farm – something being planted, growing, and then dried, maybe pickled. They are special memories and for me food is one of the biggest sources of experience we can have. It’s one of the truest ways we experience life – tasting something new is one of the most memorable things I think.”

That sense of connectivity with land and produce was rekindled at Noma, where Emil landed almost immediately after catering college. The restaurant’s approach to sourcing, preparing and serving ingredients – particularly vegetables – is what sets it apart in his eyes.

He explains: “Foraging has always been important at Noma. I’ve picked probably every herb that grows on Sjælland. And if we don’t pick it ourselves then we know where it comes from. Often the farmers bring it in themselves, still with the earth on it. It’s the way it should be.”